This new website is in beta. Please any issues.

The 2001 TranslationCorrections log

Starting in 2021, all corrections made to the Bible text will be listed here.

All previous corrections were noted in the translator notes.

February 2021

Ezra 4:5

Old text: ‘They even hired representatives against them to go to Cyrus (the king of Persia) and to the kingdom of Darius (a [co-regent] of Persia) to get the proclamation revoked.

New text: ‘They even hired advisors to strongly oppose their plans during all the days of King Cyrus of Persia, right up until the kingdom of Darius of Persia.’

Reason: It appears that Darius here is Darius of Persia, and not Darius the Mede (who was a contemporary of Cyrus of Persia), so there is no need for the ‘[co-regent]’ insert. The text does not say the hired advisors/counsellors went to Cyrus, simply that they worked at the same time; this is clear from the Greek phrase translated as “all the days” (πάσας τας ημέρας) which was not in our rendering. The words ‘to strongly oppose their plans’ replace ‘to get the proclamation revoked’, as these latter words do not appear. The words ‘plans’ comes from ‘βουλή’ (usually counsel), and ‘strongly oppose’ fits better for διασκεδάσαι (usually translated as ‘efface’ or ‘frustrate’, but can mean to ‘intimidate’ or to ‘shake violently’).

Ezra 4:24

Old text: ‘As the result, construction on the Temple of God in JeruSalem came to a halt, and it remained unfinished until the 2nd year of the reign of Darius the king of Persia.’

New text: ‘As a result, construction on the Temple of God in JeruSalem came to a halt, and it remained on hold until the 2nd year of the reign of Darius the king of Persia.’

Reason: The old rendering could be misunderstood as saying that the temple reconstruction finished in the 2nd year of Darius the Persian. Of course, it was not (Ezra 6:15 says that the temple was completed four years later in the 6th year of Darius). This verse says that the construction work was “idle” until that year (και ην αργούν έως = and it-was idle until) so the verse is corrected to better reflect the Greek source.

Luke 1:9

Old text: ‘(following the custom of the Priesthood) [ZechariAh] had been chosen by lot to enter the Most Holy of Jehovah to burn incense there.’

New text: ‘(following the custom of the Priesthood) [ZechariAh] had been chosen by lot to enter the temple sanctuary of Jehovah to burn incense there.’

Reason: The word ναός (naos) (inflected as ναόν and as ναώ in verse 21) does mean the inner part of a temple “where God resides”, however the context makes it clear that ZechariAh was not going into the Most Holy compartment, but the Holy compartment as that is where the incense altar is located. He was not the High Priest so would not even be allowed into the Most Holy. Therefore, in this context, the word ναόν must refer to the two-room temple sanctuary.

Luke 1:21

Old text: ‘“Meanwhile, the people that were waiting [outside] for ZechariAh started wondering why he was taking so much time in the Most Holy. Then when he came out and couldn’t speak, they realized that he had just seen something very unusual… he could gesture signs to them, but he couldn’t talk.’

New text: ‘Meanwhile, the people that were waiting [outside] for ZechariAh started wondering why he was taking so much time in the temple sanctuary. Then when he came out of the sanctuary and couldn’t speak, they realized that he had just seen something very unusual… he could gesture signs to them, but he couldn’t talk.’

Reason: See above. Also, the second mention of the sanctuary which appears in the Greek source was missing due to a free translation style. It’s added in to make it clearer who is where.

Genesis 2:12

Old text: ‘and the gold from that land is good. There is also coal and ornamental stone there.’

New text: ‘and the gold from that land is good. There is also red gemstone and ornamental stone there.’

Reason: The word "coal" (anthrax) is certainly correct according to Strong's, however the Greek-English ancient lexicon that tracks the use of the words in ancient times indicates that in ancient writings, the word "anthrax" was also a reference to "a precious stone of dark-red colour, including the carbuncle, ruby, and garnet" this is the usage seen in the 4th century BCE in Aristotle's writings and those of the Greek historian Phylarchus.

The same word already appears in the 2001 at Exodus 28:18 as "carbuncle", which is an archaic term for a red ruby, as it was one of the precious stones to be put in the High Priest's breast plate.

It can certainly also mean a burning hot coal, though, as "anthrax" is used in Isaiah 6:6 in the Septuagint to describe the hot coal taken from the altar by the angel that touches Isaiah's mouth. So the mystery may be solved by thinking of anthrax as meaning any red-coloured mineral, whether it's red because it's just naturally that colour, or red because it's boiling hot. If that's true, then the reference to it in Genesis 2:12 cannot mean "coal".

The Hebrew of Genesis 2:12 calls it "bedolach" (or, "bdellium"), which was thought to be amber or some other yellow-like stone.

Also, the context of Genesis is, of course, listing precious stones and metals. So coal would not fit the context either, although admittedly, it is a very short list, so perhaps this is not a valid objection.

So the word here could mean "amber", "ruby", "precious red stone", or "red gemstone". Yes, amber is not red, nor is bdellium, but most ancient languages had very few colour names, and made no distinction between red, orange, and yellow; they were all just called "red".

This explanation now appears as a translator note.

Revelation 2:22

Old text: ‘so {Look!} I will be throwing her into a bed and I will bring a time of great difficulty upon those that are enjoying sex with her, unless they repent over what they’re doing with her.’

New text: ‘so {Look!} I will be throwing her into a stretcher for carrying the dead and I will bring a time of great difficulty upon those that are enjoying sex with her, unless they repent over what they’re doing with her.’

Reason: The immoral woman is thrown into a “bed” in the Greek and Aramaic source texts, but this sounds very odd. Now, if Revelation was originally in Aramaic, then "bed" in Aramaic can also mean "Mortuary Couch". In modern terms we might say "coffin". However, it doesn’t always mean that the person on it is dead. The same word was also used at Matthew 9:2 to name the sick bed, or stretcher, on which the (very much alive) paralytic man was carried to see Jesus.

So "sick bed", as some translations say, could be correct, but so could “coffin” or “bier” (a bier is a stand on which a corpse, coffin, or casket containing a corpse is placed to be carried to the grave). The context indicates that "coffin/bier" is correct, since the next verse, verse 23 says "I'm also going to put her children to death". Interestingly, the Greek word is also the same one used for a bier.

Otherwise, the idea of an immoral woman being thrown into a bed by Jesus, who then immediately talks about those "enjoying sex with her", sounds, well, ... odd to say the least! Of course, one problem with saying “bier” is that people aren’t familiar with that term these days. So our translation says “stretcher for carrying the dead”.

This explanation now appears as a translator note.